DR Congo villagers attack UN peacekeepers

Eleven soldiers wounded in shooting during protest over alleged failure to defend village during a rebel attack.

    DR Congo villagers attack UN peacekeepers

    Eleven UN peacekeepers in the eastern Democratic Republic of Congo were wounded, two of them critically, after villagers opened fire on the troops, officials said.

    The villagers descended on the UN base in the eastern South Kivu region on Monday after an overnight attack on their village reportedly killed six people, a UN spokesman in Kinshasa, Monodje Mounoubai, told AFP news agency.

    The residents were protesting that the UN troops "did nothing to defend" the village during the attack, which was blamed on Democratic Forces for the Liberation of Rwanda, Mounoubai said.

    "Shots directed at our troops were fired from this demonstrating crowd and wounded 11, two critically and two seriously. Our troops did not return fire because if they had fired there would have been carnage," he said. "They controlled themselves."

    The UN base is in the Bunyiakiri district of South Kivu province.

    Diplomatic sources at the United Nations in New York had said the wounded peacekeepers were Pakistani.

    The UN mission in DR Congo reported that "elements" of a Mai-Mai group, the Rai Mutomboki, "may have been part of the protest and may have fired on the peacekeepers," UN spokesman Martin Nesirky said. "The mission is monitoring the situation and has sent reinforcements to the area, which is now reportedly calm but tense."

    SOURCE: Agencies


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    Survivor stories from Super Typhoon Haiyan

    Survivor stories from Super Typhoon Haiyan

    The Philippines’ Typhoon Haiyan was the strongest storm ever to make landfall. Five years on, we revisit this story.

    How Moscow lost Riyadh in 1938

    How Moscow lost Riyadh in 1938

    Russian-Saudi relations could be very different today, if Stalin hadn't killed the Soviet ambassador to Saudi Arabia.

    We Are Still Here: A Story from Native Alaska

    We Are Still Here: A Story from Native Alaska

    From Qatar to Alaska, a personal journey exploring what it means to belong when your culture is endangered.