Somali refugees still fleeing famine

Six months since famine was declared in Somalia, the Puntland region is struggling to cope with an influx of refugees.

    Somalia's semi-autonomous state of Puntland is struggling to cope with a massive influx of refugees fleeing from other parts of the country, where famine caused by a prolonged drought is widespread.

    Since July of 2011, countries across East-Africa have faced severe drought, causing one of the worst humanitarian disasters in recent history as millions suffered from starvation.

    More than 180,000 Somalis left their homes to seek help in other parts of the country and about 85,000 crossed into Kenya, mostly ending up in the Dadaab refugee camp.

    Another 47,000 Somali refugees headed west, into Ethiopia. Others fled to Djibouti and Yemen.

    Six months since the crisis was declared a famine, about 13 million people are still suffering from drought and a lack of food in East Africa.

    In Puntland in northeastern Somalia, international organisations have been providing the deprived families with food aid, but many refugees say it is not enough.

    Al Jazeera's Catherine Soi reports on the many obstacles that the humanitarian effort in that region is facing.

    SOURCE: Al Jazeera


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    Visualising every Saudi coalition air raid on Yemen

    Visualising every Saudi coalition air raid on Yemen

    Since March 2015, Saudi Arabia and a coalition of Arab states have launched more than 19,278 air raids across Yemen.

    Lost childhoods: Nigeria's fear of 'witchcraft' ruins young lives

    Lost childhoods: Nigeria's fear of 'witchcraft' ruins young lives

    Many Pentecostal churches in the Niger Delta offer to deliver people from witchcraft and possession - albeit for a fee.

    Why did Bush go to war in Iraq?

    Why did Bush go to war in Iraq?

    No, it wasn't because of WMDs, democracy or Iraqi oil. The real reason is much more sinister than that.