A force for democracy in Guinea

Special force established to provide security for polls set to bring in civilian rule.

    As Guinea prepares for its first presidential election since independence from France more than half a century ago, the West African nation's security forces are being called on to hep democracy rather than supress it.

    Dadis Camara, an army captain, seized power following the death of Lansana Conte, the country's president, in December 2008.

    Less than a year later his troops crushed an opposition rally, killing more than 150 civilians.

    But now a 16,000-strong gendarmerie and police force has been formed to supervise the elections that it is hoped will lead to a stable civilian government.

    Al Jazeera's Andrew Simmons reports from the capital, Conakry.

    SOURCE: Al Jazeera


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