Madagascar rivals exchange fire

At least one police officer killed in battle with dissident army unit in capital.

    Rajoelina has lost popularity with some sectors of the military who brought him to power [AFP]

    "We never meant to attack but they started opening fire on us. We only retaliated for half an hour when we decided to move towards their base," he said.

    "We're moving slowly, we have to be wary of collateral damage."

    Shooting broke out after hundreds of protestors converged on a barracks, complaining about abuses by the national police.

    Civilians wounded

    Police used stun grenades to disperse demonstrators. 

    In depth


     Timeline: Madagascar crisis
     Profile: Marc Ravalomanana
     Profile: Andry Rajoelina 
     Video: Exclusive interview with Ravalomanana

    Three civilians were wounded in the fighting, Claude Rakotondranja, president of the Madagascar Red Cross, said.

    Madagascar has been unstable since Andry Rajoelina, the country's president, led a coup in March 2009. The former disk jockey toppled Marc Ravalomanana with the army's support.

    The past year's political instability has dramatically slowed economic growth.

    International mediation involving the current leadership and three former presidents has not produced results.  

    Segments of the army have become increasingly disillusioned with Rajoelina's rule.

    SOURCE: Agencies


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