S Africa anger at 'Jub Jub' trial

Street protests follow court's decision to grant bail to hip-hop performer.

    Protests by school-age youths have dogged
    the hip-hop performer's trial  [AFP]

    Authorities say both defendants tested positive for cocaine and morphine after the drag race, which was held on March 8 and led to the deaths of four children and left two others in hospital in a critical condition.

    Police response

    Protests by school-age youths have dogged the three-day trial since it began on Wednesday and police dispersed protesters using rubber bullets.

    Some observers have accused the police responding to the protests in a heavy-handed fashion.

    But Fiona Forde, a South Africa-based journalist, told Al Jazeera that similar protests and the police response were a near weekly occurrence.

    "You must remember this within a broader context," she said.

    "We're just months away now from the [football] World Cup and South Africa is desperate to make sure there is a very good image going out to the international community about this country and its safety.

    "Anything like street protests is something you really want to keep a lid on."

    Jub Jub, which means marshmallow, is one of South Africa's best know hip-hop artists.

    His trial has been set for April 7.

    SOURCE: Al Jazeera and agencies


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