Papers fined for Gaddafi libel

Three Moroccan newspapers ordered to pay hefty fines for insulting Libya's Gaddafi.

    The National Union of the Moroccan Press described the trial as a "blow for press freedom in the kingdom" 

    Al Jarida Al Aoula, Al Ahdat Al Maghribia and Al Massae were sued by Gaddafi and the Libyan embassy in Morocco had asked a public prosecutor to claim damages of 30 million dirhams from each paper for articles published between 2008 and early 2009.

    Verdict denounced

    The Paris-based Reporters Without Borders strongly denounced the verdict, hoping it would be overturned in appeal.

    It warned the three penalised newspapers faced closure because of the fines.

    The trial was also strongly condemned by the National Union of the Moroccan Press, which described the trial as a "a blow for press freedom in Morocco and an attempt to execute the press".

    The union staged a demonstration following the trial outside the Casablanca court.

    Journalists held a banner calling for "the justice system to respect freedom of expression and stop attacks aimed at muzzling the press".

    SOURCE: Agencies


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    'We will cut your throats': The anatomy of Greece's lynch mobs

    The brutality of Greece's racist lynch mobs

    With anti-migrant violence hitting a fever pitch, victims ask why Greek authorities have carried out so few arrests.

    The rise of Pakistan's 'burger' generation

    The rise of Pakistan's 'burger' generation

    How a homegrown burger joint pioneered a food revolution and decades later gave a young, politicised class its identity.

    From Cameroon to US-Mexico border: 'We saw corpses along the way'

    'We saw corpses along the way'

    Kombo Yannick is one of the many African asylum seekers braving the longer Latin America route to the US.