World Cup rules on apartheid names

Tickets for 2010 event to bear apartheid-era city names and new ones.

    South Africa will be the first African country
    to host the World Cup [EPA]

    Sensitive subject

    Name changing is highly sensitive in South Africa.

    The government has championed efforts to rename towns or streets to get rid of apartheid-era names and better reflect the country's African character.

    However, the move has angered some whites, who say their history is being eroded.

    Road signs will also bear internationally known names to make it easier for visitors as many maps and guide books still use the old names.

    The first African country to host the tournament, South Africa is expecting up to 3.5 million people to take part in the month-long event.

    Television coverage

    Jerome Valcke, general secretary of FIFA, world football's governing body, said the organisation is working to ensure that public broadcasters in all African countries will show all matches for the 2010 World Cup.

    Valcke said: "We are not organising the World Cup in South Africa to have no one in Africa watch the World Cup.

    "It will be on public television, that's our commitment."

    South Africa's Telkom company announced on Tuesday that it would supply $36m-worth of telecommunication infrastructure as sponsorship for the event.

    SOURCE: Agencies


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