Chad army 'attacked from Sudan'

N'djamena says "many" dead in clashes with anti-government forces.

    Chad and Sudan accuse each other of supporting anti-government groups in their countries [File: AFP]

    A spokesman for the anti-government alliance told the AFP news agency that it was government forces that started the fighting and denied that his forces had been defeated.
      
    "There was fighting between government forces and men of the CNT [Chadian National Concord], but it's over and the CNT is still in control of the area," Maide Id Moura said.

    Casualty figures

    The government of  Idriss Deby, the president, said exact casualty figures for the rebel forces were not yet available but 38 of their vehicles had been destroyed.
       

    "Sudan has not abandoned its sinister project of destabilising Chad"


    Chadian government statement

    The Chadian National Accord said anti-government forces had lost only three vehicles and 10 men, while destroying 35 government vehicles and killing numerous soldiers.

    Last week, the Chadian National Concord accused the army of attacking its positions 30km from the Sudanese border with helicopter gunships.
      
    The previous weekend, clashes between local groups in the east resulted in more than 100 deaths, provoking intervention from Chad's army.

    N'djamena accused the Sudanese government-backed Janjawid militia of involvement in those attacks.

    Meanwhile, Al Jazeera's correspondent in Khartoum quoted government officials as saying that 17 Sudanese soldiers had been killed in an attack by Chadian forces in Sudan.

    Chad and Sudan signed a non-agression pact two months ago but frequently blame each other for supporting anti-government forces in their respective countries.

    "Sudan has not abandoned its sinister project of destabilising Chad," the government said on Monday, calling on the population "to rally more than ever behind the defence and security forces to preserve their democratic gains, and guarantee sovereignty and territorial integrity".

    SOURCE: Al Jazeera and agencies


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    How different voting systems work around the world

    How different voting systems work around the world

    Nearly two billion voters in 52 countries around the world will head to the polls this year to elect their leaders.

    How Moscow lost Riyadh in 1938

    How Moscow lost Riyadh in 1938

    Russian-Saudi relations could be very different today, if Stalin hadn't killed the Soviet ambassador to Saudi Arabia.

    The peace games: Dreaming big for South Sudan's youth

    The peace games: Dreaming big for South Sudan's youth

    A relatively new independence and fresh waves of conflict inspire a South Sudanese refugee to build antiwar video games.