Violence worsens Chad crisis

UN considers a peacekeeping mission to troubled Darfur neighbour.

by
    Ban Ki-moon wants to send peacekeepers to Chad  [AP]

    "In previous attacks they only shot men, but this time they also shot women and children."
     
    Inter-ethnic conflict
     
    Armed groups are plentiful in Chad. Some cross the border from the
    Darfur region of Sudan while others are home grown.
     
    Antonio Guterres, the UN high commissioner for refugees, said: "You have rebels that attack government troops, you have at same time inter-ethnic conflict between different tribes, nomads versus farmers and then you have widespread banditry."

    With instability growing at an alarming rate, the United Nations Security
    Council has been considering a peacekeeping mission to Chad.
     
    Ban Ki-Moon, the UN secretary general, spoke of sending nearly 11,000 troops to stop the spillover attacks from Darfur and to protect civilians within the camps.
     
    Abdakar, another Chadian homeless, said: "Living conditions here are very hard. There is a lack of clean water, and food. Women are attacked when they get out to collect firewood to cook."

    Aid agencies feared that the growing violence threatens to slow humanitarian assistance to a trickle.

    Not only is there a scarcity of clean drinking water, according to the British aid group Oxfam, some camps contain as many as 15,000 people without a single latrine.

    Jennifer Abrahamson of Oxfam International, said: "The international needs to be completely aware of the ongoing strife in the region and ensure that these innocent civilians are protected so we don't see another crisis that reaches the same levels as what we've seen in Darfur."

    SOURCE: Al Jazeera


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