Painting a 'divine intervention' story

For hundreds of years, people have captured the moment when they felt their prayers were answered in what is known as ex voto, or devotion.

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    It is a historic Mexican tradition. Giving thanks by painting a story in which someone believes there was divine intervention.

    For hundreds of years, people have captured the moment when they felt their prayers were answered in what is known as ex voto, or devotion.

    The stories range from the saving of life to slightly surreal. The common connection is they believe praying to a Christian saint brought them what they wanted or needed. And they are as popular today as pieces of art.

    Al Jazeera's Alan Fisher reports from Mexico City.


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