Bolivia after Morales: Indigenous communities fear setbacks

More than 40 percent of Bolivia's population is indigenous. So was Evo Morales, its president till recently.

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    Earlier on Sunday, Mexico's president said that the former Bolivian leader Evo Morales was a victim of a coup d'etat.

    Bolivia's indigenous people felt they were uplifted when one of their own became president nearly 14 years ago.

    Under Morales as the first indigenous president, poverty was reduced for the formerly marginalised people.

    Now, weeks after he was forced to resign, many wonder what comes next for the country's indigenous communities.

    Al Jazeera's John Holman reports from Huatajata.


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