Saudi Aramco tells clients oil loading has resumed: Report

Oil tanker loading operations now in progress after disruption caused by Saudi Aramco attacks, sources tell Reuters.

    Oil prices surged on Monday amid worries over global supply and tensions in the Middle East [File: Ahmed Jadallah/Reuters]
    Oil prices surged on Monday amid worries over global supply and tensions in the Middle East [File: Ahmed Jadallah/Reuters]

    Saudi Aramco has told some clients that vessel loading has resumed following disruptions caused by the weekend's attacks on Saudi oil facilities, two sources who received the notice told Reuters on Monday.

    The state company's Oil Supply Planning and Scheduling (OSPAS) department, citing the notice, said loading operations were in progress.

    Three sources with major Asian refineries, including one of the two that have seen the port notice, told Reuters that their oil tanker loading was normal as of Monday.

    "We have a few cargoes to load ... We are concerned about the impact (of the attack), but so far we hear from port agents that it has been OK," one of the sources said.

    "Our oil loading has not been impacted yet," another one of the sources said. "But we need to see the official notice from them [Aramco] ... It will take a bit more time to see the impact."

    The sources declined to be identified as they were not authorised to speak to the media.

    Separately on Monday, three trade sources told Reuters that Saudi Aramco's trading arm was looking for oil products for prompt delivery following Saturday's attacks.

    Aramco Trading Company (ATC), the trading arm of Saudi Aramco, is making enquiries to buy diesel for prompt delivery, two of the trade sources said. Saudi Arabia is typically a net exporter of diesel.

    "They are looking [for oil products] since they are trimming runs at some of the refineries," one source said, declining to be named as he was not authorised to speak to the media.

    A third trading source said that Aramco Trading may have bought two ultra-low sulphur diesel cargoes, although this could not be confirmed immediately and details were not available.

    The attacks knocked down 5.7 million barrels per day of crude production - more than half of Saudi Arabia, the top exporter's output - or over five percent of global oil supply. Saudi officials have given no timeline for restoring full supply, but a source close to the matter told Reuters it could take "weeks, not days".

    Oil prices surged on Monday amid worries over global supply and tensions in the Middle East.

    SOURCE: Reuters news agency