Texas twin-engine plane crash kills 10 near Dallas

Small plane heading from Addison to St Petersburg, Florida crashes shortly after taking off.

    A massive column of black smoke poured out of a building at the airport in Addison after the crash [Ian Johnson]
    A massive column of black smoke poured out of a building at the airport in Addison after the crash [Ian Johnson]

    A small plane has crashed into a hangar at an airport in Texas, United States, killing all 10 people on board.

    "The Dallas County Medical Examiner has confirmed 10 fatalities and no survivors," a spokeswoman for the town of Addison told AFP news agency on Sunday.

    The twin-engine plane was heading from Addison, a suburb of Dallas, to St Petersburg, Florida and was carrying two flight crew and eight passengers, said Bruce Landsberg, Vice Chairman of the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB).

    The identities of those killed were not immediately released.

    NTSB investigator Jennifer Rodi said the plane - which had changed ownership recently - hit a private hangar at the airport.

    The plane had just lifted off the runway at the south end of the airport when it veered left, dropped its left wing and slammed into the hangar, the Dallas Morning News reported, citing Addison fire department spokesman Edward Martelle.

    David Snell, who was waiting for another flight at the airport, told local news channel KDFW TV he saw the plane take off.

    "It looked like it was clearly reduced power. I didn't know if it was on purpose or not, but then, when the plane started to veer to the left and you could tell it couldn't climb."

    A massive column of black smoke poured out of a building at the airport after the crash, as firefighters directed streams of water towards the blaze.

    Asked if the behaviour of the plane indicated engine failure, Landsberg said: "We cannot confirm that there was an engine failure at this point."

    "There are any number of possibilities that could occur," he said.

    SOURCE: News agencies