Georgia's historians fight against censorship of Soviet archives

They accuse the national archive of hiding information about crimes committed when Georgia was part of the erstwhile USSR.

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    Historians in Georgia are fighting, what they say, the censorship of Soviet archives.

    Between the 1920s and 50s, tens of thousands of Georgians were executed or exiled by Josef Stalin and his henchmen in a society infiltrated by informants.

    They accuse the national archive of blanking out information about crimes committed when Georgia was part of the erstwhile USSR.

    A trove of information that could help Georgians come to terms with their past will stay hidden as long as the state believes censorship is in the public interest.

    Al Jazeera's Robin Forestier-Walker reports from Tbilisi.


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