Russia's St Petersburg marks 75 years since Nazi siege

By the time the siege on the Russian capital was broken, hunger, disease, bombs and shells had killed more than half a million civilians.

by

    This weekend, Russia has been marking 75 years since the Nazi siege of Leningrad was broken.

    For nearly 900 days, the former Russian capital was cut-off.

    Hundreds of thousands of people starved to death as the German army pounded the city with artillery fire and bombing runs.

    Leningrad, now known by its original name St Petersburg, has been remembering the historic tragedy.

    Al Jazeera's Rory Challands reports from St Petersburg.


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    Visualising every Saudi coalition air raid on Yemen

    Visualising every Saudi coalition air raid on Yemen

    Since March 2015, Saudi Arabia and a coalition of Arab states have launched more than 19,278 air raids across Yemen.

    Lost childhoods: Nigeria's fear of 'witchcraft' ruins young lives

    Lost childhoods: Nigeria's fear of 'witchcraft' ruins young lives

    Many Pentecostal churches in the Niger Delta offer to deliver people from witchcraft and possession - albeit for a fee.

    Why did Bush go to war in Iraq?

    Why did Bush go to war in Iraq?

    No, it wasn't because of WMDs, democracy or Iraqi oil. The real reason is much more sinister than that.