Russia's St Petersburg marks 75 years since Nazi siege

By the time the siege on the Russian capital was broken, hunger, disease, bombs and shells had killed more than half a million civilians.

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    This weekend, Russia has been marking 75 years since the Nazi siege of Leningrad was broken.

    For nearly 900 days, the former Russian capital was cut-off.

    Hundreds of thousands of people starved to death as the German army pounded the city with artillery fire and bombing runs.

    Leningrad, now known by its original name St Petersburg, has been remembering the historic tragedy.

    Al Jazeera's Rory Challands reports from St Petersburg.


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