South Sudan refugees sceptical of new peace deal

Refugees from South Sudan's civil war want to return home, but say that they have seen peace deals fall apart before.

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    When South Sudan became an independent nation more than seven years ago, there were high hopes for the oil-rich state, but the country collapsed into a civil war shortly thereafter.

    A new peace deal signed in September should be bringing hope to the millions - more than a quarter of the population - that have been displaced.

    But the complex deal appears unknown to many refugees and those that have heard of it are sceptical. After all, the war that has killed hundreds of thousands continued after an earlier peace deal in 2015 collapsed after less than a year.

    For the displaced, the deal on paper matters less than an end to the violence.

    Al Jazeera's Hiba Morgan reports from neighbouring Sudan.


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