Russia-Ukraine tensions: Martial law not so evident in Kharkiv

People in this second-largest city of Ukraine are worried about invasion from Russia.

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    More police on the ground and extra vigilance - that’s how Kharkiv, the second-largest city in Ukraine, has changed since the martial law is in place in the wake of the country's conflict with Russia over Crimea.

    However, local officials have assured people that the moves which will restrict their constitutional rights will only be brought into effect if Russia starts an open act of aggression.

    Al Jazeera's Andrew Simmons reports from Kharkiv.


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