Iraqis suffer with no water or electricity after ISIL's defeat

Fear and lack of opportunities are shared across former ISIL-controlled territory, as the armed group stripped everything from infrastructure and repairs are delayed by continued sporadic attacks.

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    People in Iraq's western Anbar desert are struggling to rebuild their lives months after the defeat of ISIL.

    The destruction of infrastructure means that basic services still are not functioning and will require lengthy and expensive repairs to be restored.

    The army says attacks in the area still continue sporadically, which is delaying rebuilding efforts and the return of many residents.

    Al Jazeera's Osama Bin Javaid reports from Al Qaim on the Iraqi-Syrian border.


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