Qatar refutes Saudi, UAE allegations of supporting 'terrorism'

Doha denies allegations by Saudi Arabia and UAE and instead accuses blockading countries of destabilising the region.

    There has been no improvement in the relations between Qatar and the blockading countries following the General Assembly [AFP]
    There has been no improvement in the relations between Qatar and the blockading countries following the General Assembly [AFP]

    The Gulf crisis has led to exchange of words at the United Nations General Assembly between Qatar and the countries imposing the blockade on the gas-rich nation.

    Qatar refuted allegations by Bahrain, Saudi Arabia and United Arab Emirates (UAE) of supporting "terrorism" on Saturday as the Gulf crisis featured at the UN forum.

    "The representative of Qatar said that the three countries are the last ones to preach Qatar about peace and stability," Al Jazeera's Hashem Ahelbarra, reporting from New York, said.

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    "He referred to the past track record of Saudi Arabia and the UAE in the war in Yemen and instability in Libya as well as the US Congress inquiry into September 11 attacks, which blamed the two countries for providing  havens for 'terrorists,'" our correspondent said.

    Ahmad Saif Al Kuwari, Qatar's representative to the UN, said that "they do not practise what they preach", referring to the blockading countries.

    "They do not practice respect for state sovereignty and they interfere in the affairs of other states.

    "This has become evident in the repeated attempts by these states to destabilise security and stability in Qatar. They plotted and financed an unsuccessful coup attempt in Qatar."

    UAE response

    The UAE representative, in her response, claimed that Qatar adopted political maneuvers in order to exacerbate the ongoing crisis.

    "Instead of respecting its international obligations and settling the crisis, Qatar has added an international dimension by discussing legal matters taken by the United Arab Emirates in cooperation with Bahrain, Saudi Arabia and Egypt," she said.

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    "Qatar is trying to disseminate false and erroneous information about the measures taken by our countries. These measures were response to the destabilising attitude of Qatar for decades."

    On June 5, 2017, Saudi Arabia, the UAE, Bahrain and Egypt imposed a sweeping embargo on the gas-rich nation, sparking the worst rift within the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC).

    The four countries severed all diplomatic and trade ties, accusing Qatar of seeking closer ties with regional rival Iran and "supporting terrorism" - a charge Doha vehemently denies.

    A US-backed meeting between foreign ministers of the six member states of the GCC, Egypt and Jordan in New York ended in a "stalemate", said Qatar's Foreign Minister Sheikh Mohammed bin Abdulrahman Al Thani.

    SOURCE: Al Jazeera


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