Korean families reunite after being separated since 1950s

About 200 North and South Koreans separated from families since Korean War are finally reuniting this week after six decades of being forbidden from commuting with relatives across border.

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    Some 200 Koreans separated from their families since the Korean War are finally reuniting this week.

    For six decades, most Koreans have been forbidden from sending letters or emails or calling their relatives on the other side of the border.

    Millions of families were separated during the war that ended in 1953. Nearly 133,000 people in the South have applied to meet their relatives.

    Only 57,000 applicants are still alive, and many are in their 80's or older.

    This week's reunion event will be the first of its kind since October 2015.

    Al Jazeera's Paul Chaderjian has the story of one of the 100 people from the South meeting her long-lost loved ones.


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