Cambodia's banned opposition party calls election a 'sham'

Prime Minister Hun Sen's victory is practically assured after the party that nearly defeated him five years ago was dissolved and no credible replacement has emerged.

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    Sunday's general election in Cambodia is being described by the opposition as an "undemocratic sham" because the prime minister can't lose.

    Hun Sen stamped out the main threat to further extending his 33-year rule by banning the largest opposition party.

    Independent media outlets and NGOs have also been shuttered and their staffs harassed.

    Al Jazeera's Wayne Hay reports from the capital Phnom Penh.


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