Putin: New Russian weapons decades ahead of foreign rivals

Russian president says Russia has made breakthrough in designing new weapons that are decades ahead of foreign designs.

    Putin: New Russian weapons decades ahead of foreign rivals
    Putin says Russian nuclear programme was only for defensive purposes [File: Reuters]

    Russian President Vladimir Putin has boasted about his country's prospective nuclear weapons, saying they are years and even decades ahead of foreign designs.

    The new weapons represent a quantum leap in the nation's military capability, Putin told graduates of Russian military academies in the Kremlin on Thursday.

    He said that Russia has made a "real breakthrough" in designing new weapons.

    The Russian leader also spoke glowingly about the new Avangard hypersonic vehicle and the new Sarmat intercontinental ballistic missile, which are set to enter service in the next few years.

    Putin also mentioned the Kinzhal hypersonic missile that has already been put on duty with the units of the country's southern military district.

    The Russian president had in March presented the systems among an array of new nuclear weapons in the thick of tensions with the West.

    He revealed the new nuclear weapons could hit any target around the globe with little chance of interception.

    Russia and the West are at odds in several conflicts - including Syria, where Russia supports President Bashar al-Assad - and Ukraine.

    SOURCE: AP news agency


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