Libya: Amazighs demand language be recognized in constitution

Around a half-million Amazighs live in Libya, but their language was banned by Gaddafi and now they want it protected by Libya's new constitution.

    An ethnic group in Libya is fighting for official recognition of their language which was banned during the 40-year rule of Muammar Gaddafi.

    The interim Constitutional Declaration continues to ignore the Amazigh language seven years after the killing of Gaddafi.

    Al Jazeera's Mahmoud Abdelwahed reports from Yifrin, Libya.


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