Kenya flood death toll continues to rise

Heavy downpours in recent weeks have killed scores of people and raised the threat of cholera.

    Heavy seasonal rain in central and southern Kenya has killed more than 100 people since April, while the resultant flooding has displaced over 200,000 more.

    Authorities in the country and humanitarian groups have been airlifting stranded residents and providing aid to villages cut off by the floods.

    Kenya's Red Cross has called the flooding a "humanitarian crisis" that requires emergency funding.

    The flooding has also resulted in cholera outbreaks, with 15 of the country's 47 counties being affected. 

    Kenya's Meteorological Department had predicted above-average rain in the western and central parts of the country, with remaining areas expected to be average.

    The East African country receives most of its rain between March and May/June. A second rainy season, known as the "little rains" occurs in November, but rainfall then is much lighter.

    Flooding problems have also been reported in Uganda and Somalia.

    The United Nations estimates that half a million people have been affected in Somalia, with close to 175,000 being displaced.

    SOURCE: Al Jazeera and news agencies


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    Learn what India's parties' symbols mean by drawing them

    Learn what India's parties' symbols mean by drawing them

    More than 2,300 political parties have registered for the largest electoral exercise in the world.

    Visualising every Saudi coalition air raid on Yemen

    Visualising every Saudi coalition air raid on Yemen

    Since March 2015, Saudi Arabia and a coalition of Arab states have launched more than 19,278 air raids across Yemen.

    Why did Bush go to war in Iraq?

    Why did Bush go to war in Iraq?

    No, it wasn't because of WMDs, democracy or Iraqi oil. The real reason is much more sinister than that.