Erdogan in Africa: ‘New world order’ in the making

Turkey's interests in Africa rival the ones of France, UK, and China.

    Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan concluded his five-day tour in Africa on Saturday.

    "We want to walk with Africa while a new world order is being established," Erdogan said as quoted by Tukey's official Presidential page at the end of his five-day tour of four African countries.

    Erdogan said he had held "productive" talks and made contacts in Algeria, Mauritania, Senegal and Mali. "We love Africa and our African brothers without any bias," Erdogan said.

    Tour highlights

    • Fishing: Erdogan highlighted that over 40 Turkish fishing vessels are now actively fishing in Mauritanian waters.

    • "As our private sector increases investments in Mauritania, we intend to develop our relations based on the principle of 'win-win'," Erdogan said.

    • G5 Sahel: Turkey will contribute five million dollars to the G5 Sahel Joint Force, to counter what it calls a "terror threat" in the Sahel region.

    • "Turkey has made great progress in this area over the last years," writes the official website of the Turkish presidency.

    • Mali stability: "We are ready to do our part for political and economic stability of Mali, where I paid the first visit at a presidential level. Besides this, we will strengthen our brotherhood while reinforcing cultural and trade relations."


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