Separated Korean families remember their ancestors

In South Korea, families split between the two Koreas gather to remember relatives on the other side of the border and hope for the opportunity to reunite with loved ones.

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    The Lunar New Year has arrived, a time when Koreans pay respects to their ancestors.

    But for families separated by the 1950s Korean War, it can be a time of painful memories.

    Many don't know if their relatives are alive or dead - the last time families split between North and South Korea were able to reunite was 2015, but some hope that the recent warming of relations will provide new opportunities.

    Al Jazeera's Natasha Ghoneim reports from near the border between the two Koreas.


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