Raqqa: Displaced people in urgent need of basic infrastructure

In the aftermath of ISIL's ejection from Raqqa, no one has stepped up to rebuild the devastated city and the presence of YPG fighters is unsettling the returning local population.

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    People displaced from the Syrian city of Raqqa say they are being pressured into returning to their destroyed homes.

    Parents there are worried about their young children stepping on unexploded bombs.

    The mostly Arab population is also fearful of the number of Kurdish-led fighters controlling the city.

    Fighters of the YPG militia deny accusations that they have cleansed Arabs from their towns and villages.

    Al Jazeera's Osama Bin Javaid reports from the western bank of the Euphrates river.


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