Monument of the past: Jordan's relationship with Jerusalem

In 1965, King Hussein wanted to make a material statement regarding Jordan’s sovereignty over East Jerusalem. After declaring it to be the Hashemite Kingdom’s second capital, he decided to build a vacation residence on the summit of Tell el-Ful.

by

    In 1965, King Hussein wanted to make a material statement regarding Jordan's sovereignty over East Jerusalem. After declaring it to be the Hashemite Kingdom's second capital, he decided to build a vacation residence on the summit of Tell el-Ful.

    The late Jordanian King Hussein's partially built summer palace, however, remained as a concrete shell, abandoned following the Six-Day War.

    Today, a half-century after the Six-Day War, Tell el-Ful is a place where time appears to have come to a standstill.

    High on a hill in Occupied East Jerusalem stands, untouched, the abandoned concrete frame of what was supposed to become a royal palace; a stark reminder of battles over Jerusalem.

    Al Jazeera's Alan Fisher sheds light on this connection between the Jordanian royal family and Jerusalem.


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    Interactive: Plundering Cambodia's forests

    Interactive: Plundering Cambodia's forests

    Meet the man on a mission to take down Cambodia's timber tycoons and expose a rampant illegal cross-border trade.

    The priceless racism of the Duke of Edinburgh

    The priceless racism of the Duke of Edinburgh

    Prince Philip has done the world an extraordinary service by exposing the racist hypocrisy of "Western civilisation".

    China will determine the future of Venezuela

    China will determine the future of Venezuela

    There are a number of reasons why Beijing continues to back Maduro's government despite suffering financial losses.