Argentina: DNA reunites thousands after 'Dirty War'

During Argentina's 'Dirty War' in the 1970s and 80s, tens of thousands of people were killed by government forces. Among them were pregnant women or mothers whose children were put up for adoption.

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    In Argentina, DNA technology is helping thousands of families to reunite with their missing relatives.

    About 30,000 people were killed by government forces in the 1970s and 80s during the so-called Dirty War.

    Many of their young children were put up for adoption or lied to about their parents.

    Today, forty years on, efforts are being made to address the issue as grandparents seek their grandchildren who disappeared or people who suspect they were put up for adoption as for answers.

    Al Jazeera's Teresa Bo explains from Buenos Aires.


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