Zimbabwe: Social media reacts to Robert Mugabe's speech

After President Robert Mugabe defies calls to resign in anticipated speech, many take to Twitter to express their views.

    Thousands of Zimbabweans rallied on Saturday calling for Mugabe's resignation [Philimon Bulawayo/Reuters]
    Thousands of Zimbabweans rallied on Saturday calling for Mugabe's resignation [Philimon Bulawayo/Reuters]

    Many Zimbabweans have expressed shock on social media after President Robert Mugabe ended a much-expected national address on Sunday without announcing his resignation. 

    Mugabe, who has been leading Zimbabwe for 37 years, has been under increasing pressure to relinquish power following a surprise military takeover earlier this week.

    On Saturday, thousands of people took to the streets of the capital, Harare, calling on the 93-year-old leader to resign and showing support for the military's action. 

    Mugabe was widely expected to announce his resignation in the televised address but defied expectations by pledging to preside over a ruling ZANU-PF party congress next month instead.

    On Twitter, some conveyed anger at having the protesters' demands ignored. 

    On Facebook, one person said: 

    Others simply poked fun at the situation. 

    Al Jazeera's Haru Mutasa, reporting from Harare after Mugabe's speech, said "a lot of people are surprised" he did not step down "after all this pressure".

    "Sources behind the scenes say that he is being stubborn and for now he isn't going anywhere," added Mutasa.

    "The thing to watch now is the Monday midday deadline when, if he doesn’t step down, then they will impeach him in parliament."

    SOURCE: Al Jazeera News


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