World's most dangerous place for press: Covering the war in Syria

Syria is the world's most dangerous country for journalists. More than 200 media personnel have been killed since the start of the war, six years ago.

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    The UN has marked the International Day to End Impunity for Crimes Against Journalists on Thursday.

    More than 800 journalists have been killed around the world over the past decade for just doing their jobs, the UN said. Only one in ten cases committed against media workers has led to a conviction.

    Syria has become the world's most dangerous country for journalists.

    More than 200 media personnel have been killed since the start of the war, six years ago.

    Dozens are in prisons or have been kidnapped by armed groups, including ISIL, and many are still missing.

    According to senior UNESCO official, Frank La Rue, impunity had led to more abuses against journalists.

    "UNESCO is concerned that impunity damages whole societies by covering up serious human rights abuses, corruption, and crime," he said.

    "Governments, civil society, the media, and everyone concerned to uphold the rule of law are being asked to join in the global efforts to end impunity," he added.

    Al Jazeera's Hashem Ahelbarra reports from Gaziantep in Turkey, near the border with Syria, on the challenges journalists face as they risk their lives in covering the conflict. 


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