Afro-Brazilian Quilombo fear change in land laws

The Quilombo are 400-year-old communities in Brazil descended from escaped slaves. Now they are are facing a new threat from a proposed change to Brazilian law that critics fear will strip them of their land rights.

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    The Quilombo are 400-year-old communities in Brazil descended from escaped slaves.

    They’ve survived and sometimes prospered, usually in remote locations where their African ancestors mixed with indigenous and Portuguese cultures.

    But the Quilombos are facing a new threat from a proposed change to Brazilian law that critics fear will strip them of their land rights. The government’s support base includes wealthy landowners and agribusinesses who have a vested interest in these laws changing.

    Daniel Schweimler reports from Sao Paulo state, Brazil.


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