Thailand's lese-majeste law 'stifling dissent'

Thailand's former King Bhumibol Adulyadej, the world's longest-serving monarch, will be cremated on Thursday, over a year after he died. Over the past three years, more than 100 people have been charged or convicted for insulting the monarchy.

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    Thailand’s former King Bhumibol Adulyadej, the world’s longest-serving monarch, will be cremated on Thursday, over a year after he died.

    While millions of people are mourning the revered monarch, who ruled for 70 years, Thailand's military government is ramping up its crackdown on people insulting or criticising the royal family.

    Over the past three years, more than 100 people have been charged or convicted of violating the country’s strict draconian lese-majeste law (violating majesty), which forbids any insult to the monarchy.

    The military leadership says some democracy will return next year, but there is no indication that will mean freedom of speech when it comes to the monarchy.

    Al Jazeera's Wayne Hay reports from the capital, Bangkok.


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