Kuwaiti emir accepts resignation of government

Resignation comes as parliament is scheduled to hold two votes of no-confidence against information minister.

     Prime Minister Sheikh Jaber al-Mubarak al-Sabah has held his post since 2011 [File: EPA]
    Prime Minister Sheikh Jaber al-Mubarak al-Sabah has held his post since 2011 [File: EPA]

    The emir of Kuwait has accepted the resignation of the government amid a crisis with parliament, Kuwaiti media has reported.

    Prime Minister Sheikh Jaber al-Mubarak al-Sabah had offered the resignation of his government earlier on Monday.

    The Gulf nation's National Assembly was scheduled to hold two votes of no-confidence against Minister of State for Cabinet Affairs and acting Minister of Information Sheikh Mohammad Abdullah al-Mubarak al-Sabah on Tuesday and Wednesday, the Kuwait News Agency (KUNA) reported.

    According to the assembly's agenda, the legislators would have voted on motions submitted by 10 members of parliament on a range of issues.

    The agenda included discussing the formation of temporary committees focused on youth and sports, housing and business environment for people with special needs, women and family affairs, and environment.

    Prime Minister Sabah has held his post since 2011 and was reappointed after the parliamentary election the following year.

    Kuwait has experienced frequent cabinet reshuffles in the recent past; the latest was in February.

    SOURCE: Al Jazeera News


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