Berlin project strives to forge understanding

AfD gained many votes by attacking the decision to accommodate more than one million refugees two years ago.

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    Berlin - The far-right party Alternative for Germany has won parliament seats in the country for the first time since the Nazi era. AfD gained many votes by attacking the decision to accommodate more than one million refugees two years ago. For those new arrivals to Germany it is a time of uncertainty. But one project in Berlin is trying to create understanding and unity. The project, called Multaka, which means meeting point in Arabic, also aims is to emphasise the contribution of migrants to Western culture.


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