Argentina's Kirchner testifies in 1994 bombing case

Prosecutors investigating former government's alleged role in hiding Iran's role in attack on Jewish centre in Buenos Aires.

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    Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner, Argentina's former president, has testified in an investigation into one of her country's deadliest attacks, which killed eighty-five people at a Jewish centre in Buenos Aires in 1994.

    The case is looking into her administration's suspected role in hiding Iran's alleged involvement in the bombing that took place in Argentina's capital.

    Prosecutors say her government had a secret deal with Tehran that guaranteed immunity to some members of the Iranian government who allegedly took part of in the bombing in question.

    In 2015, the special prosecutor investigating the case was found dead in his apartment shortly after he charged Kirchner over the case.

    She denies the accusations, claiming that President Mauricio Macri is politically manipulating the judge handling the case.

    Argentina: Former president Kirchner launches new party

    "Kirchner administration signed a memorandum with Iran that would allow Argentine judges to interrogate suspects in Iran," said Al Jazeera's Teresa Bo, reporting from Buenos Aires on Thursday.

    "Prosecutors say the memorandum was signed because Kirchner wanted to make business with Iran.

    "Kirchner, who is being prosecuted for treason, says she is innocent. And she says she only wanted to bring to justice an incident that happened over 20 years ago."

    Kirchner, who was elected a senator in midterm legislative elections on Sunday, now has congressional immunity, which protects her from charges such as money laundering, bribery and embezzlement.

    However, Julio De Vido, a former minister of Kirchner, turned himself in and was jailed on Wednesday over corruption charges after his immunity was revoked by Argentina's Congress earlier in the day.

    Kirchner has already been charged three times since leaving office in different cases. The development involving De Vido highlights the former president's continued legal vulnerability.

    SOURCE: Al Jazeera News


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