Nobel winner Malala wins place at Oxford University

Pakistani-born Malala Yousafzai, shot by the Taliban for promoting girls' education, accepted by Oxford University.

    Malala Yousafzai, the world's youngest Nobel Peace Prize winner, has been accepted at Oxford University [File: EPA]
    Malala Yousafzai, the world's youngest Nobel Peace Prize winner, has been accepted at Oxford University [File: EPA]

    Malala Yousafzai, the 20-year-old Pakistani education activist and youngest winner of the Nobel Peace Prize, has gained a place at Britain's Oxford University.

    "So excited to go to Oxford!!" she tweeted on Thursday, celebrating her acceptance to Oxford after getting her A-level results.

    Malala also congratulated other students receiving their results, tweeting "Best wishes for life ahead!".

    She will study philosophy, politics and economics.

    The University of Oxford has confirmed Yousafzai's acceptance to the DPA news agency.

    Yousafzai had said in March during an education conference in Birmingham that she received an offer to study at a British university.

    READ MORE: Malala Yousafzai: Pakistan's divisive figure

    Yousafzai first came to international prominence in 2012 after a Taliban gunman shot her in the head near her school in Pakistan's Swat Valley.

    She wrote then under the pen name "Gul Makai", the name of the heroine from a local Pashtun folk tale.

    Yousafzai now lives in the UK, where she received medical treatment following her shooting.

    Malala is also one of only six people to receive honorary Canadian citizenship.

    Malala and Satyarthi receive joint Nobel prize

    SOURCE: Al Jazeera and news agencies


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