Kuwait: Gulf rift may lead to undesirable consequences

Emir of Kuwait vows to spare no efforts to bridge up difference among GCC member states and resolve the crisis.

    Kuwait: Gulf rift may lead to undesirable consequences
    Sheikh Sabah, 87, has visited Saudi Arabia last week [Saudi Royal Court handout/Reuters]

    The Emir of Kuwait, who has led mediation efforts to resolve the Gulf crisis, has cautioned that the dispute between Qatar and three fellow Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) members could lead to "undesirable consequences".

    Sheikh Sabah Al Ahmad Al Sabah was quoted by Kuwait's state news agency as saying on Monday that it was difficult for him to see the division among GCC member states.

    Kuwait's ruler to meet Saudi King over GCC row

    "It is quite difficult for us, the generation that built the GCC 37 years ago, to see the divisions among its members which may lead to undesirable consequences," Sheikh Sabah said.

    "I lived the first moments of building the GCC and this is why I cannot stand silent without trying to mediate for the rapprochement among the brothers. It is a duty that I cannot walk away from.

    "No matter how difficult the efforts, I will do my best to mediate among the brothers," he said.

    Sheikh Sabah, 87, visited Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates and Qatar last week in an effort to find a diplomatic solution to the crisis.

    Qatar's Minister of Foreign Affairs Sheikh Mohammed bin Abdulrahman Al Thani said earlier on Monday that he remained committed to the Kuwaiti process.

    READ MORE - Qatar-Gulf crisis: All the latest updates

    Saudi Arabia, the UAE, Bahrain and Egypt cut diplomatic and transport ties a week ago, accusing Doha of backing "terrorism" - charges that Qatar denies.

    The three Arab Gulf countries also ordered Qatari nationals to leave within 14 days, while Saudi, UAE and Bahraini citizens were also given the same timeframe to leave Qatar.

    Amnesty International criticised the move, accusing the Gulf states of toying with the lives of thousands of people in their dispute with their neighbour.

    The sanctions have also disrupted imports of food and other materials into Qatar and caused many foreign banks to scale back their business with the country.

    Can diplomacy solve the crisis in the Gulf? – Inside Story

    SOURCE: Al Jazeera and news agencies


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