Sri Lanka feels the heat

Pre-monsoon heat extends right across South Asia.

by

    Over the past few weeks, temperatures across South Asia have steadily built up ahead of the summer rains.

    There has been much talk of the severe heat and, at times, drought conditions that have accompanied this pre-monsoon heat across India and Pakistan.

    Sri Lanka has suffered alongside them as the sweltering conditions have intensified.

    Temperatures in Colombo, the nation's capital, have been running just above the April average of 31 degrees Celsius. However, the humid onshore winds have made it feel more like 36C.

    Despite the high temperatures, this remains a part of the world where many people do not have air conditioning in their homes.

    The young and the elderly are most vulnerable and warnings have been issued across the country.

    The heat has even been felt up on the higher ground. Nuwara Eliya is a city in the tea country hills of central Sri Lanka, it is known as little England because climate in the city is similar to that in parts of Europe.

    Nuwara Eliya normally has an April temperature of around 10 to 15C. The mercury reached 24C on Wednesday. Recent days have seen highs nearer 22C.

    The heat will only really be broken with the onset of the southwest monsoon and the summer rains.

    That remains another month away. In the meantime much of south Asia will feel the heat and increasing humidity for some time to come.

    SOURCE: Al Jazeera


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    Interactive: Coding like a girl

    Interactive: Coding like a girl

    What obstacles do young women in technology have to overcome to achieve their dreams? Play this retro game to find out.

    Why America's Russia hysteria is dangerous

    Why America's Russia hysteria is dangerous

    The US exaggerating and obsessing about foreign threats seems quite similar to what is happening in Russia.

    Heron Gate mass eviction: 'We never expected this in Canada'

    Hundreds face mass eviction in Canada's capital

    About 150 homes in one of Ottawa's most diverse and affordable communities are expected to be torn down in coming months