Turkey hits PKK targets in Iraq: military

Turkish army says air strikes hit weapon stores, shelters in Qandil area of northern Iraq.

    Turkish jets have carried out intermittent strikes against the PKK in north Iraq since July 2015 [EPA]
    Turkish jets have carried out intermittent strikes against the PKK in north Iraq since July 2015 [EPA]

    The Turkish military has said it carried out air strikes in northern Iraq against targets belonging to the Kurdistan Workers Party (PKK).

    In a statement posted on its website, the Turkish Armed Forces said the airstrikes had targeted weapon stores, shelters and other PKK sites in the Qandil area of northern Iraq.

    Iraqi Kurdistan's mountainous, remote Qandil region is the main base for the PKK.


    Is the West too soft on Turkey's PKK?


    Turkish jets have carried out intermittent strikes against the PKK in north Iraq since July 2015 after the fighters' abandoned a ceasefire.

    Security operations inside Turkey have resulted in the deaths of thousands of civilians, soldiers, police and PKK militants.

    Last week, Turkish warplanes struck PKK targets in northern Iraq and seperately killed 24 PKK fighters in southeastern Turkey.

    More than 40,000 people have been killed in the conflict since the PKK launched its insurgency in 1984.

    The PKK, which says it is fighting for Kurdish autonomy, is designated as a terrorist group by Turkey, the United States and the European Union. 

    SOURCE: Reuters


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