Deaths as suicide bomber hits market in Cameroon

Suicide bombers kill at least 12 people and injure 50 others in market in Meme, northern Cameroon.

    Boko Haram is thought to have killed about 15,000 people and driven more than two million from their homes [Reuters]
    Boko Haram is thought to have killed about 15,000 people and driven more than two million from their homes [Reuters]

    Two suicide bombers killed at least 12 people and injured 50 others in a market in Meme, northern Cameroon on Friday, military sources told the Reuters news agency.

    Two men walked into the market and blew themselves up, one of the officials based in northern Cameroon said, adding that the number of dead and injured is subject to change.

    There has so far been no official claim of responsibility for the attack but officials pointed the finger at Nigeria-based Boko Haram, which has been blamed for a campaign of suicide attacks in neighbouring countries Cameroon, Chad and Niger over the past year.

    Boko Haram violence in Cameroon has caused about 1,000 deaths, according to the Cameroon government and military sources.

    Boko Haram is thought to have killed about 15,000 people and driven more than two million from their homes during its six-year insurgency in one of the world's poorest regions. 

    Nigeria, Chad, Niger, Cameroon and Benin have set up an 8,700-strong regional force tasked with wiping out Boko Haram. 

    SOURCE: Reuters


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