Israel destroys homes of alleged Palestinian attackers

Israeli military was granted clearance from the Supreme Court to raze the homes of Palestinians' accused of attacks.

    Israel destroys homes of alleged Palestinian attackers
    Last month Israel ordered an intensification of demolitions [Majdi Mohammed/AP]

    Israel has razed the homes of four Palestinians in the occupied West Bank blamed for attacking Israelis, the army has said, its latest punitive demolition after weeks of deadly unrest.

    The military carried out the demolition orders on Saturday after clearance from the Supreme Court.

    In Nablus in the northern West Bank, the military destroyed the homes of three Palestinians accused of killing an Israeli settler couple on October 1 at the start of the latest flare-up of violence, the army said.

    In Silwad, northeast of Ramallah, they razed the home of a Palestinian accused of killing an Israeli on a West Bank road in June, it added.


    RELATED: House demolitions: Israel's 'court-sanctioned revenge'


    Israel has renewed a home demolition tactic that it says is a legal and effective tool to deter attacks. 

    Last month, the Israeli government ordered an intensification of punitive home demolitions in response to a wave of stabbing and shooting attacks and other deadly unrest.

    It says the controversial policy acts as a deterrent but critics say the main victims of such demolitions are relatives forced to pay for another person's actions.

    Ten Israelis have been killed since October 1, while 80 Palestinians have been shot dead by Israeli security forces, including 44 people whom Israel claimed were carrying out attacks. 

    The violence over the past six weeks has, in part, been fuelled by an increase in Jewish visits to the Al-Aqsa Mosque compound in East Jerusalem, a site holy to both Muslims and Jews.

    Palestinians inspect a house that was demolished by the Israeli army in the village of Silwad on Saturday [Majdi Mohammed/AP]

    SOURCE: Agencies


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    Interactive: How does your country vote at the UN?

    Interactive: How does your country vote at the UN?

    We visualised 1.2 million votes at the UN since 1946. What do you think are the biggest issues facing the world today?

    'We were forced out by the government soldiers'

    'We were forced out by the government soldiers'

    We dialled more than 35,000 random phone numbers to paint an accurate picture of displacement across South Sudan.

    Interactive: Plundering Cambodia's forests

    Interactive: Plundering Cambodia's forests

    Meet the man on a mission to take down Cambodia's timber tycoons and expose a rampant illegal cross-border trade.