Bending over backwards to become China's next acrobats

In an age of online entertainment and digital gaming, acrobats in China are still able to attract huge crowds.

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    Wuqiao, China - In an age of online entertainment and digital gaming, acrobats in China are still able to attract huge crowds.

    And one poor part of eastern China is providing a wealth of new acrobatic talent for traditional troupes.

    Young people from Wuqiao have traditionally become acrobats out of necessity. Good acrobats can make about $2,000 a month, about the same as an office job.

    Students face a punishing schedule that begins at 6am, with four hours of acrobatics followed by three hours of regular classes, six days a week. Living and eating together, it is also a life spent away from their families.

    But for those who gain work, the ordeal is considered worth it.

    SOURCE: Al Jazeera


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