Renewed clashes at Jerusalem's Al-Aqsa Mosque compound

At least three arrested in second day of clashes as Israeli security forces storm the compound of Al-Aqsa Mosque.

    Palestinians and Israeli police clashed at Jerusalem's Al-Aqsa Mosque compound for a second straight day on Monday, prompting several arrests.

    "As the police entered the compound, masked youths fled inside the mosque and threw stones at the force," an Israeli police statement said.

    Police said they entered the hilltop compound to ensure that Muslim youths massing there did not harass Jews or tourists during the morning visiting hours. The statement added that three protesters were arrested.

    Israeli security personnel on Sunday used tear gas and stun grenades in a move condemned by Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas, as they entered the compound to arrest what they called Palestinian "stone throwers".

    "The presidency strongly condemns the attack by the occupier's military and police against the Al-Aqsa Mosque and the aggression against the faithful who were there," a statement from his office said.

    Non-Muslims are allowed to visit the compound, but Jews must display national symbols for fear of triggering tensions with Muslim worshippers.

    Muslims fear Israel will seek to change rules governing the site, with far-right Jewish groups pushing for more access and even efforts by fringe organisations to erect a new temple. Al-Aqsa Mosque is Muslim's third holiest site.

    Israel seized East Jerusalem, where Al-Aqsa is located, in the Six Day War of 1967 and later annexed it in a move never recognised by the international community.

    SOURCE: Al Jazeera and agencies


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