Israeli troops clash with Palestinians at al-Aqsa

Soldiers storm the mosque compound and fight with Muslim worshippers who have barricaded themselves inside.

    Clashes have erupted for a second day in a row in occupied Jerusalem  after Israeli security forces stormed al-Aqsa Mosque compound and fought with Palestinian worshippers.

    Witnesses on the ground told Al Jazeera that the Israeli police entered the mosque shortly before 7am local time (04:00 GMT) on Monday.

    Sources told Al Jazeera the officers used al-Maghareba gate to enter the compound.

    They reportedly fought with the worshippers, who have barricaded themselves at the mosque.

    Sources said at least 15 Palestinians were injured.

    Al Jazeera's Imtiaz Tyab, reporting from occupied East Jerusalem, said clashes continued and tensions "are high" as far-right Jewish groups prepare to enter the mosque compound.


    Timeline: Al-Aqsa Mosque


    He said several police officers were spotted at the roof of the mosque.

    Inside Story: Can Netanyahu change Al-Aqsa status quo?

    He quoted witnesses as saying that the police fired the stun grenades through windows at a small number of worshippers, and used metal barricades to shield themselves as they approached the mosque's main gate.

    For their part, the worshippers threw stones and hurled fire crackers at the police, the witnesses said.

    "The confrontations are relatively minor but they are ongoing," Al Jazeera's Tyab said.

    The fresh violence occurred on the Jewish holiday of Sukkot, which began on Sunday evening. During the week-long holiday, many Jews visit Jerusalem.

    According to a 50-year long agreement, Jews and people of other religions are allowed to enter the compound between 7:30am and 11:30am local time, but are not allowed to pray.

    Palestinian worshippers, however, said that far-right Jews have been provoking them by praying, thus violating the agreement.

    SOURCE: Al Jazeera


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