FIFA bans former vice-president Warner for life

Trinidadian was found to have committed 'many and various acts of misconduct continuously and repeatedly'.

    FIFA bans former vice-president Warner for life
    Blatter had disgraced FIFA by his actions, according to the now-banned Warner [AP]

    Trinidadian Jack Warner, once one of the most powerful men in football, has been banned from all football-related activities for life, the ethics committee of world governing body FIFA said.

    Warner, 72, was one of 14 football officials and sports marketing executives who were indicted in the United States on May 27 on bribery, money laundering and wire fraud charges involving more than $150m in payments.

    One Minute FIFA

    The FIFA ethics committee said Warner was investigated following an inquiry into the bidding process for the 2018 and 2022 World Cups.

    In the latest twist in the corruption scandal, Swiss authorities said last week they were investigating FIFA President Sepp Blatter on suspicion of criminal mismanagement and misappropriation of funds.

    The tournaments were awarded to Russia and Qatar respectively in December 2010 by the FIFA executive committee, of which Warner was a member.

    Warner was found to have committed "many and various acts of misconduct continuously and repeatedly during his time as an official in different high-ranking and influential positions at FIFA and CONCACAF," the committee said

    Warner is the former president of CONCACAF, the Confederation of North, Central American and Caribbean Association Football. He is currently in his native Trinidad and Tobago, where he is fighting extradition to the United States.

    Warner resigned from his posts when he was placed under investigation by the ethics committee in 2011 over a cash-for-votes scandal in the run-up to that year's FIFA presidential election. The case was subsequently dropped by the ethics committee as he was no longer involved in football.


    Read more: 'Cooperating' Blatter will remain FIFA president


    SOURCE: Agencies


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    Senegal's village of women

    Senegal's village of women

    Women in northeast Senegal are using solar-powered irrigation to farm food and halt the encroaching desert.

    Inside Baltimore's human trafficking industry

    Inside Baltimore's human trafficking industry

    Survivors of sex trafficking and those who investigate it in the city share their stories.

    Nuclear Gulf: Is Saudi Arabia pushing itself into a nuclear trap?

    Nuclear Gulf: Is Saudi Arabia pushing itself into a nuclear trap?

    MBS is prepared to pursue nuclear weapons if Iran gets them. But could he end up making the kingdom a nuclear pawn?