Malema corruption trial in S Africa set to resume

Opposition leader faces corruption charges he and his supporters have dismissed as politically motivated.

    The trial of Julius Malema, the leader of the opposition Economic Freedom Fighters and a former leader of the ANC youth wing, has been delayed again after being adjourned last September.

    The trial, which was supposed to begin on Monday, has been postponed until Tuesday because one of Malema's four associates also on trial was too ill to appear at the court.

    An outspoken critic of corruption, he is accused of receiving $400,000 from involvement in corrupt road construction projects.

    The charges include fraud, corruption, racketeering and money-laundering.

    If convicted, Malema could spend a maximum of 15 years in prison, pay a large fine and lose his seat in parliament.


    2013 interview: South Africa's Julius Malema


    Malema and his supporters have repeatedly dismissed the allegations as politically motivated, saying his prosecution is a punishment for accusing President Jacob Zuma of corruption.

    In August last year, Malema led "pay back the money" chants against Zuma, triggering scuffles in parliament.

    He has demanded that Zuma repay the $24m of taxpayers' money spend on "security upgrades" at his extravagant private home.

    Malema himself, along with four business associates, is accused of lying to win a public works construction contract in his home province of Limpopo, worth $4.6m.

    The proceeds are alleged to have been used to help buy Malema a luxury Mercedes Benz Viano and a large farm.

    SOURCE: Al Jazeera and agencies


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