Woods shoots best score in 16 months

Former world number one hits a four-under 66 to stay four strokes behind leader Langley at Greenbrier Classis.

    Woods is ranked outside the top-100 [AP]
    Woods is ranked outside the top-100 [AP]

    Tiger Woods shot his lowest score in 16 months, a four-under-par 66 that left him four strokes behind leader Scott Langley after the opening round of the Greenbrier Classic.

    Though conditions were relatively easy on Greenbrier's rain-softened Old White Course, the round was a welcome reprieve for Woods, whose shocking slump over the past year raised questions of whether he ever again would be competitive.

    Two weeks before the British Open at St. Andrews, where he has won twice, the 39-year-old former world number one declared he was "very close" to hitting top form.


    News: Woods falls out of world's top-100


    "People think I'm crazy when I say I'm close but I felt like I was close," Woods told PGATour.com after a round that included seven birdies, one bogey and a double-bogey in White Sulphur Springs, West Virginia.

    "This past week was a good week (of practice) and today I hit the ball well all day until a couple of tee shots at the end, tugged a couple."

    It might be dangerous to read too much into one good round, as it has been less than four weeks since Woods shot the worst score of his career, an 85 at the Memorial tournament in Ohio, and then missed the cut at the US Open.

    While Woods understandably grabbed the limelight, American Scott Langley compiled eight-under 62 for a one-stroke lead over compatriot Jonathan Byrd and New Zealand's Danny Lee.

    SOURCE: Reuters


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    Survivor stories from Super Typhoon Haiyan

    Survivor stories from Super Typhoon Haiyan

    The Philippines’ Typhoon Haiyan was the strongest storm ever to make landfall. Five years on, we revisit this story.

    How Moscow lost Riyadh in 1938

    How Moscow lost Riyadh in 1938

    Russian-Saudi relations could be very different today, if Stalin hadn't killed the Soviet ambassador to Saudi Arabia.

    We Are Still Here: A Story from Native Alaska

    We Are Still Here: A Story from Native Alaska

    From Qatar to Alaska, a personal journey exploring what it means to belong when your culture is endangered.