Yemen humanitarian pause comes into effect

Unclear if two sides honouring ceasefire, which began shortly after arms-depot blasts near Sanaa killed at least 69.

    Both sides have said they will respond violently if the other breaks the ceasefire [EPA]
    Both sides have said they will respond violently if the other breaks the ceasefire [EPA]

    A five-day humanitarian ceasefire has begun in Yemen, just hours after Arab coalition fighter jets struck against Houthi fighters and their allies.

    It was not immediately clear if the two sides were honouring the truce, which began at 11pm local time [20:00GMT] on Tuesday.

    The pause in the fighting, which has killed hundreds of civilians, will test the two sides' desire to enter into peace talks.

    Both the Houthis and the Arab-coalition-backed Yemeni government say they are ready to respond with violence if their opponent breaks the ceasefire.

    Earlier on Tuesday, at least 69 people were killed and 250 others wounded by explosions after coalition fighter jets hit an arms depot near the Yemeni capital Sanaa, according to medical officials.

    Residents said that explosions at a military base at Mount Noqum lasted until mid-day on Tuesday after coalition jets struck the depot late on Monday.

    The conflict in Yemen has killed more than 1,400 people - many of them civilians - since March 19, according to the UN [EPA]

    An official told the AFP news agency that most of the people killed and wounded were civilians.

    Medics on the ground had given an earlier toll of five killed and 20 wounded.

    The air strikes set off huge explosions that sent debris crashing into a residential area at the foot of the mountain, witnesses said.

    Elsewhere, in Taiz, shelling blamed on Houthi fighters killed at least 10 people.

    Adel al-Jubeir, the foreign minister of Saudi Arabia, which is leading the Arab coalition, was quoted as saying on Monday that the truce might be extended if aid deliveries succeeded and if the Houthis and their allies did not engage in hostile activities.

    The conflict in Yemen has killed more than 1,400 people - many of them civilians - since March 19, according to the UN, and the country of some 25 million has endured shortages of food, water, medicine and electricity as a result of a naval, air and land blockade.

     

    SOURCE: Agencies


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