England in control despite Blackwood's maiden ton

Tourists lead by 220 runs at close on day three of the opening Test against West Indies.

    Ballance and Root have put on 64 for the fourth wicket [Reuters]
    Ballance and Root have put on 64 for the fourth wicket [Reuters]

    England recovered from another top-order batting collapse to lead West Indies by 220 runs on day three of the opening Test in Antigua after Jermaine Blackwood had scored his first Test century.

    Replying to England's 399, Blackwood was the mainstay of the West Indies innings, finishing unbeaten on 112 as the hosts were dismissed for 295.

    England's Jonathan Trott, Alastair Cook and Ian Bell were dismissed cheaply but Gary Ballance (44*) and Joe Root (32*) took England to 116 for three at the close.

    The 23-year-old Blackwood, who made three fifties in his first five Tests, played with a discipline and maturity that belied his inexperience but he began to relax with several boundaries including a towering six, his second of the innings.

    He brought up his hundred with a single but two balls later Tredwell dismissed Jason Holder for 16, caught by Ballance in the covers.

    Off-spinner Tredwell finished with test-best figures of four for 47 and Anderson claimed two wickets to move within one of Ian Botham's England record of 383 victims.

    In reply, England lost early wickets again but Ballance and Root, both averaging over 50 in Test cricket, pushed England's lead beyond 200.

    Scorecard (Day 3):

    England 399 all out and 116-3 (Ballance 44*, Taylor 2-12)

    West Indies 295 all out (Blackwood 112*, Tredwell 4-47)

    SOURCE: Al Jazeera and agencies


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